About Nolé

Where New Orleans and Latin American cuisine meet

The Story of Nolé

Al Copeland, Jr met Chris Lusk in early 2018 when Al Copeland Investments was doing research on the New Orleans market’s culinary traditions, its position as a food capital and trends developing in the restaurant industry. Al was intrigued with Chris’ background and combined cultural interest.

Both connected in the realization that there was yet an “unexplored” food segment that was not being presented…and one that more clearly defined the cultural parallels and counterparts of food preparation, selection of ingredients and environment style that link the Latin and New Orleans food cultural histories. Al Copeland Jr.’s love for his own French, Cajun background and Lusk’s desire for an authentic take on Latin American cuisine combined seamlessly. Their shared experiences growing up around skillful farmers using local ingredients to create authentic, regional cuisine. The end result was Nolé.

Both cultures have a deep appreciation for the celebration of everyday moments. They also find joy in the hottest summers, in New Orleans, you could be walking down the street and a parade starts – the same thing happens in Latin America. Whether through Mardi Gras or Carnival, everything is a party. They connect in the most mundane tasks, through food, art, music, festivals and literature.
It’s from these similarities and the palatable passion these cultures exude that Nolé was born. A union of two already intertwined cultures. Here to take the people of New Orleans on a culinary journey that always leads us back home.

Open Every Day

MONDAY – THURSDAY
11am – 2pm & 5pm – 10pm

FRIDAY – SATURDAY
11am – 11pm

SUNDAY
11am – 9pm


Join us for Happy Hour
Every Day

4 – 6:30pm


GIFT CARDS AVAILABLE

2001 St Charles Ave
New Orleans, LA 70130

(504) 593-9955
[email protected]

MONDAY – THURSDAY
11am – 2pm & 5pm – 10pm

FRIDAY – SATURDAY
11am – 11pm

SUNDAY
11am – 9pm

JOIN US FOR HAPPY HOUR

EVERY DAY

4 - 6:30pm

GIFT CARDS AVAILABLE

Our Menu

The customs and cuisine – or cocina – of Latin America parallel New Orleans’ most notable traditions, both cultural and culinary.

A love of flavorful food full, of natural heat and local ingredients pervades both places and is often accompanied by enthusiastic conversation about what the next meal will be. There is a process to the food in both regions; families pride themselves on their gumbo recipes here, just as familial mole recipes are presented with pride across Latin America, a crawfish boil here has as many nuances as a savory Asado there, and both are worthy social events, both in the food preparation and its consumption.

Al Copeland Jr. was raised in Cajun Country on flavors of French, Creole. His family hunted their proteins and grew their own produce. The flavors of the homemade roux, seasonings and hot sauces all came from the fresh ingredients they had at home.

Chris Lusk saw these similarities from an early age. Growing up in Texas and watching his grandparents bring local ingredients to life with heavy Latin American Influence. Lusk remembers his childhood amazement at the depth that something as simple as cilantro can add to a dish. Lusk has culinary training, working and traveling with chefs from Guatemala, Nicaragua, Cuba, and other Latin American countries.

Copeland and Lusk’s families grew up in different places but had so many of the same experiences with food and family. It all seemed to just fit together when they met. They took their experiences and put an innovative take on familiar fare utilizing red beans in salsa, and serving Latin street corn with lime aioli, blue crab, and creole cream cheese. Lusk uses chorizo and cochon du lait in his paella and cracklins in a traditional Latin American pork stew. They have the drive to add local ingredients by layering flavors to two similar yet different cuisines to marry the two cultures together and taste every component that creates the menu.

Our Menu

The customs and cuisine – or cocina – of Latin America parallel New Orleans’ most notable traditions, both cultural and culinary.

A love of flavorful food full, of natural heat and local ingredients pervades both places and is often accompanied by enthusiastic conversation about what the next meal will be. There is a process to the food in both regions; families pride themselves on their gumbo recipes here, just as familial mole recipes are presented with pride across Latin America, a crawfish boil here has as many nuances as a savory Asado there, and both are worthy social events, both in the food preparation and its consumption.

Al Copeland Jr. was raised in Cajun Country on flavors of French, Creole. His family hunted their proteins and grew their own produce. The flavors of the homemade roux, seasonings and hot sauces all came from the fresh ingredients they had at home.

Chris Lusk saw these similarities from an early age. Growing up in Texas and watching his grandparents bring local ingredients to life with heavy Latin American Influence. Lusk remembers his childhood amazement at the depth that something as simple as cilantro can add to a dish. Lusk has culinary training, working and traveling with chefs from Guatemala, Nicaragua, Cuba, and other Latin American countries.

Copeland and Lusk’s families grew up in different places but had so many of the same experiences with food and family. It all seemed to just fit together when they met. They took their experiences and put an innovative take on familiar fare utilizing red beans in salsa, and serving Latin street corn with lime aioli, blue crab, and creole cream cheese. Lusk uses chorizo and cochon du lait in his paella and cracklins in a traditional Latin American pork stew. They have the drive to add local ingredients by layering flavors to two similar yet different cuisines to marry the two cultures together and taste every component that creates the menu.

Make a Reservation

Make a Reservation